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Biology

Biology faculty member and chemistry student honored as IUPUI women leaders

INDIANAPOLIS -- Kathleen Marrs, School of Science, associate professor of biology, earned recognition as a veteran faculty member. Amna Sohail, bachelor of arts in chemistry, recieved a student award.

The celebration included a keynote address by Kristin Syvantek Garvey, the executive director of the Indiana Commission on Women.

Founding executive director named to head STEM institute

INDIANAPOLIS -- The institute builds upon IUPUI’s substantial strengths in science, technology, engineering and math education and research. It is dedicated to the development, dissemination and promotion of STEM education programs and initiatives across the campus and in collaboration with external partners.

Junior biology student named IUPUI's 2016 most outstanding male student

INDIANAPOLIS – Science students represented half of this year’s Top 20. The selection of IUPUI outstanding students was announced at the Top 100 Outstanding Students Recognition Dinner on April 8. 

To the surprise and delight of attendees at the awards dinner, Otun sung his acceptance speech. Otun, a biology student, aspires to be a neurosurgeon.

IUPUI ecohydrologist studies fog, dew and other novel water sources for dryland vegetation

INDIANAPOLIS -- His work is supported by a new CAREER award from the National Science Foundation. 

Drylands, which are expanding, currently cover nearly 40 percent of the globe and are home to approximately 2.5 billion people. In the United States, these arid areas are found in southern California, Arizona, New Mexico and portions of the Great Plains. With global warming, more areas in the United States and around the world are becoming increasingly dry and desert-like.

Biology graduate student places third in regional 3MT competition

INDIANAPOLIS – The 3MT® competition was developed by the University of Queensland, Australia and challenges Ph.D. students to effectively communicate their research to a non-specialist audience in the three minutes with only one slide without a script or cue cards.

Advisor of the year award presented to biology student & alumni services coordinator

INDIANAPOLIS -- Alexander is the student & alumni services coordinator for the Indiana University-Purdue University School of Science Department of Biology. She has been with the department since 2008 and has served as a student advisor for 23 years.

More than 10 letters of recommendation from students, staff and faculty supported Alexander’s nomination for the award.

National Kidney Month: IUPUI biologist develops treatments for polycystic kidney disease

INDIANAPOLIS -- Bonnie Blazer-Yost, professor of biology, said the disease equally affects people across gender, race and ethnicity. It can dramatically change the kidneys' appearance and function.

IUPUI researchers use stem cells to identify cellular processes related to glaucoma

INDIANAPOLIS -- Their goal is the development of therapies to prevent or cure glaucoma. 

In addition to glaucoma, a group of degenerative diseases that damage the eye's optic nerve and can result in vision loss and blindness, this work has potential implications for treatment of optic- nerve injuries of the types incurred by soldiers in combat or athletes in contact sports.

School of Science announces record number of Top 100 Students for 2016

INDIANAPOLIS – "We congratulate all of the Top 100 honorees," said School of Science Dean Simon Rhodes. "At IUPUI and in the School of Science, our students combine academic excellence with a unique environment where they can also develop remarkable research, leadership and community engagement skills".

Enhanced levels of carbon dioxide are likely cause of global dryland greening, study says

INDIANAPOLIS -- The positive trend in vegetation greenness has been observed through satellite images, but the reasons for it had been unclear.  

After analyzing 45 studies from eight countries, Lixin Wang, assistant professor of earth sciences in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and a Ph.D. student in Wang's group, Xuefei Lu, concluded the greening likely stems from the impact of rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide on plant water savings and consequent increases in available soil water.

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